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GMail: How to save your account from deletion action

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GMail: How to save your account from deletion action
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Google’s Big Plan to Delete Inactive Accounts – What Users Should Do

May 16, 2023, Asuncion, Paraguay: Google sign in page is displayed on a smartphone. Google said on Tuesday that it plans to delete accounts that have remained inactive for two years - including content within Google Workspace (Gmail, Docs, Drive, Meet, Calendar), YouTube and Google Photos. ''While the policy takes effect today, it will not immediately impact users with an inactive account - the earliest we will begin deleting accounts is December 2023,'' the company said. (Credit Image: © Andre M. Chang/ZUMA Press Wire May 16, 2023, Asuncion, Paraguay: Google sign in page is displayed on a smartphone. Google said on Tuesday that it plans to delete accounts that have remained inactive for two years - including content within Google Workspace (Gmail, Docs, Drive, Meet, Calendar), YouTube and Google Photos. ''While the policy takes effect today, it will not immediately impact users with an inactive account - the earliest we will begin deleting accounts is December 2023,'' the company said. (Credit Image: © Andre M. Chang/ZUMA Press Wire

Quelle: picture alliance / ZUMAPRESS.com

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The entire digital identity often depends on the e-mail account. If you don’t want to lose them, you should still act this year. Because Google plans to gradually delete inactive accounts. Other popular e-mail providers have long since had similar guidelines.

HDo you have an old Google user account in which digital memories still slumber but which you no longer use? Then you should quickly dig out the password again, log in once, send an e-mail – and thus reset an invisible deletion countdown.

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Because the Internet company Google is planning a large one Clean-up campaign under his user accounts: Google wants to gradually delete all accounts that have not been used for at least two years. The group wants to use it to get rid of dead files and save space.

The deletion campaign is scheduled to start from the end of 2023, when Google first wants to throw older, inactive, then younger unused accounts from its servers – including all content, emails, favorites lists, backups, documents, pictures and videos.

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For regular users who use their account regularly, this is hardly relevant – their accounts are safe. Even those who forget to log in regularly will be warned and reminded several times by e-mail before deletion. A single successful login to the e-mail account is sufficient to reset the timer. This is counted as an activity by Google.

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Accounts that contain YouTube videos are also not at risk. Because if the company were to delete them, it would delete a good part of YouTube history and destroy videos whose creators may have been dead for a long time, but which could have historical value.

But in all other cases, the new deletion rule could cause problems: many users keep it E-mail accounts of deceased relatives online, also because they want to avoid leaking the email addresses to others. Here the heirs have to react and log in once. Without a suitable password however, that would be impossible.

Who is actually liable for video content on YouTube and Instagram?

So far, social networks and video platforms such as YouTube or Facebook are not responsible for the content made available. But does this also apply to the algorithms that these videos propose?

The deletion rule is even worse for all those who cannot log in for other reasons: be it that users are currently unable to log in for medical reasons – the extreme case would be a coma – be it that they are currently and are offline for a long time.

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In the USA in particular, this problem is likely to affect many prisoners who do not have access to the Internet behind bars, but who also do not want to pass on the login to relatives, even if it is not to incriminate themselves.

Google is not the only service that locks the account in case of inactivity

They would have to completely rebuild their digital identity after their release from prison, because the e-mail account is often the key to various other services such as payment providers or digital service providers. Without it, access to digital content from other providers, such as streaming services, also expires.

However, Google is not the only mail service that blocks the account in the event of inactivity: the German e-mail providers GMX and Web.de according to their terms of use, delete an unused account after twelve months.

First only the saved content, later also the entire e-mail address. The providers do not reveal the period after which e-mail addresses are reassigned.

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In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is required, since the providers of the embedded content as third-party providers require this consent [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (which can be revoked at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can withdraw your consent at any time via the switch and via privacy at the bottom of the page.

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