Home » NTSB Investigates Fatal Crash Involving Ford Electric Vehicle with Automated Driving System

NTSB Investigates Fatal Crash Involving Ford Electric Vehicle with Automated Driving System

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NTSB Investigates Fatal Crash Involving Ford Electric Vehicle with Automated Driving System

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is currently investigating a fatal crash that occurred in San Antonio, Texas, involving a Ford electric vehicle with a partially automated driving system. The incident took place on February 24 on Interstate 10, where a Ford Mustang Mach-E SUV equipped with the company’s automated system collided with the rear of a Honda CR-V that was stopped in one of the lanes.

The driver of the Mach-E informed police that the Honda had stopped in the center lane with its lights off before the crash occurred, resulting in the death of the 56-year-old driver of the CR-V. The NTSB is particularly interested in this case due to its focus on advanced driver assistance systems and how vehicle operators interact with these technologies.

Ford’s Blue Cruise system, which allows drivers to momentarily take their hands off the wheel while driving on highways, is not fully autonomous and only works on 97% of controlled-access highways in the United States and Canada. The company emphasized that the system continuously monitors drivers to ensure they remain attentive to the road.

Despite the ongoing investigation, Ford has expressed its condolences to those involved in the crash and reported the incident to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The NTSB and NHTSA have previously conducted investigations into incidents related to partially automated driving systems, primarily focused on Tesla’s Autopilot system.

Further details and analysis of the crash are expected in the coming weeks as investigators from the NTSB travel to San Antonio to examine the scene and gather information. Ford has also stated that they are conducting their own internal investigation into the incident.

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