Home Business The State Food and Drug Administration responded to the so-called “toothpaste against Helicobacter pylori”: lack of scientific basis

The State Food and Drug Administration responded to the so-called “toothpaste against Helicobacter pylori”: lack of scientific basis

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The State Food and Drug Administration responded to the so-called “toothpaste against Helicobacter pylori”: lack of scientific basis

Beijing News Express According to the website of the State Food and Drug Administration on January 7th, currently, there are some hot-selling products on the market with the name “toothpaste” claiming to be “anti-Helicobacter” and “removing bad breath by anti-Helicobacter pylori” “And other effects. Many of these products are not toothpastes in the true sense. So, what is toothpaste? Can toothpaste cure diseases? Here, remind consumers to pay attention to the following points:

1. Toothpaste cannot be claimed to have a medical effect

Toothpaste refers to a semi-solid preparation that acts on the surface of human teeth by brushing teeth to assist in cleaning. Toothpaste has the effects of beautifying and protecting teeth and surrounding tissues. According to the “Regulations on Cosmetics Supervision and Administration” that will be implemented on January 1, 2021, toothpaste is managed in accordance with the regulations of ordinary cosmetics; after the efficacy of toothpaste is evaluated in accordance with national standards and industry standards, it can be declared to have anti-caries, anti-plaque, Anti-dentin sensitivity, reduce gum problems and other effects. It is worth noting that toothpaste cannot express or imply that it has a medical effect, and cannot make false or misleading claims about its efficacy. At present, the State Food and Drug Administration is stepping up efforts to formulate departmental regulations specifically for toothpaste management, “Toothpaste Supervision and Administration Measures,” and will promote the introduction of the regulations as soon as possible.

2. Toothpaste claims “anti-H. pylori” lacks scientific basis

Helicobacter pylori mainly exists in the human stomach. There is no evidence that brushing teeth with toothpaste can affect Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. In addition, the oral cavity is a complex environment where a variety of bacteria and other microorganisms coexist. Studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori that may be present in the oral cavity is mainly concentrated in saliva and plaque. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity and periodontal disease, bad breath, gastric cancer and other digestive diseases is still lacking evidence-based medical evidence. Products such as toothpastes that claim to be “anti-H. pylori” may contain broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. If a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic agent is used in large quantities for a long time, it may cause disorder of the oral flora, which is not conducive to oral health.

Finally, remind consumers: toothpaste is not a medicine, and toothpaste cannot replace medicine to treat diseases. If you have a disease, it is recommended to follow the doctor’s advice for treatment.

Editor Xin Jing

Source: State Drug Administration website

Original title: Toothpaste does not cure disease

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