Home » Prince William’s Absence at King Constantine of Greece’s Memorial Service: A Personal Matter

Prince William’s Absence at King Constantine of Greece’s Memorial Service: A Personal Matter

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Prince William’s Absence at King Constantine of Greece’s Memorial Service: A Personal Matter

Prince William will miss a memorial service for the late King Constantine of Greece due to a personal matter, a royal source told CNN. The Prince of Wales, 41, was expected to attend the memorial event at Windsor Castle on Tuesday.

The source did not elaborate on the last-minute change of plans but added that William’s wife, the Princess of Wales, who is recovering from abdominal surgery in January, “continues to do well.” The same source added that William called the family to inform them that he would not be able to attend.

Kate has been out of the public eye as she continues to recover at home and is not expected to return to royal duties until after Easter. Meanwhile, King Charles III is also absent from service as he continues treatment for an undisclosed form of cancer. The 75-year-old monarch recently revealed that the numerous messages of support he has received since being diagnosed with cancer made him cry.

Another royal source told CNN that there was no connection between the Prince of Wales’s personal matter and the King’s health. Queen Camilla led the family at a gathering in honor of the last Greek monarch at St George’s Chapel. Constantine II of Greece, second cousin of King Charles III, died in January last year at the age of 82.

Charles and Constantine enjoyed a close relationship, and the British royals even named his cousin as godfather to their first-born son, William. After a military coup in 1967, Constantine and his family fled to Rome and the military regime appointed a regent to take his place.

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The Greek monarchy was abolished on June 1, 1973, when the military regime proclaimed the country a republic, a decision that was supported by a subsequent referendum. Constantine accepted abolition after an elected civilian government held another referendum in 1974.

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