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beliefs without any scientific basis – breaking latest news

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beliefs without any scientific basis – breaking latest news

The Myth of Food Combinations: Why You Shouldn’t Believe Everything You See on Social Media

A new trend has been circulating on social media, warning people to avoid certain food combinations for the sake of their health. From not eating cheese and eggs in the same meal to avoiding acidic fruit, these so-called rules of food combinations have been gaining traction online. However, according to experts, these guidelines have no scientific basis and are simply a product of hygienism, not hygiene specialists.

One of the banned combinations is proteins and proteins. The theory behind this is that different protein foods require specific enzymes for digestion, so it is best to avoid combining them. However, this assumption is false, as the enzymes that degrade proteins are the same regardless of the protein source.

Another combination to avoid is carbohydrates and proteins, with the belief that the enzymes that degrade these nutrients work in different environments and can create digestive difficulties. In reality, this is not a problem at all as the digestive tract can handle partially degraded nutrients without issue.

Even something as innocent as watermelon and pasta has been labeled as a forbidden combination by hygienists. The rapid decomposition of watermelon and the digestive compromise it poses have been called into question by experts as an oddity with no scientific backing.

While the list goes on, including bananas and fish and fruit consumption during lunch, it is important to note that these guidelines have no scientific basis and are simply a product of misinformation.

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Lucilla Titta, coordinator of the Smartfood program at the Ieo-European Institute of Oncology, has reviewed these so-called food combinations and debunked them as fake theses. It is essential to be critical of the information we see on social media and not fall victim to false claims about food and nutrition.

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