Home » Improving Access to Palliative Medicine: The Creation of a Specialization Program in Mexico

Improving Access to Palliative Medicine: The Creation of a Specialization Program in Mexico

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Improving Access to Palliative Medicine: The Creation of a Specialization Program in Mexico

The CU agrees to create the Specialization in Palliative Medicine

The University Council has approved the creation of the Specialization in Palliative Medicine within the school system. The program will last three years and consist of 693 credits, which corresponds to 12 mandatory academic activities.

This new study plan will begin to be taught at the “Manuel Gea González” General Hospital and will then be extended to other medical units that meet the requirements stipulated by the Faculty of Medicine.

The approval of the Specialization in Palliative Medicine is crucial for Mexico due to the large gap in access to palliative medicine for those at the end of life. According to the Official Gazette of the Federation, the country has a serious lack of service infrastructure and a shortage of opioids. Despite legislation on the matter being established in 2009, there is still a lack of training for primary, secondary, and tertiary care.

The Project also emphasizes that Mexico must face the demographic and epidemiological transition, as there are about 468 thousand people with serious health-related suffering annually, accounting for nearly 230 thousand deaths and 37 percent of national mortality. This includes adults with chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, AIDS, and diabetes, among others.

Currently, access to palliative care services is limited in Mexico, with only a few public institutions offering them. While some states lack any palliative care services, others only offer them in the state capitals.

Moreover, training for health personnel in this discipline is minimal, with only six out of 111 medical schools offering courses on palliative care in undergraduate studies.

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This move is aimed at addressing the growing need for palliative care in Mexico and aligns with international standards.

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