Home Health It seems hard to believe but this bad habit could double the risk of Alzheimer’s and triple that of dementia

It seems hard to believe but this bad habit could double the risk of Alzheimer’s and triple that of dementia

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Protecting the brain is one of the greatest favors we can do to our body. The brain is our center of operations and is responsible for many functions. Unfortunately, however, it is also the organ most subject to aging and the danger of degenerative diseases. And it is precisely for this reason that it must be preserved by all means. Fortunately for us, there are many ways to do this. The first is to work on nutrition. For example, we could have snappy brains and a very active memory thanks to this very easy-to-prepare drink that could really help our neurons.

The second is to avoid very dangerous habits. And it seems hard to believe but this bad habit could double the risk of Alzheimer’s and triple that of dementia. The confirmation comes from science and once again underlines the importance of prevention and a healthy lifestyle. Let’s see what it is and what the possible health risks are.

It seems hard to believe but this bad habit could double the risk of Alzheimer’s and triple that of dementia

According to the latest report from the Italian National Institute of Health, there are more than a million people suffering from dementia in our country. Of these, about 50-60% suffer from Alzheimer’s. A health problem that also has strong repercussions on the social life of sick people and those who have to take care of them.

And it is precisely for this reason that it becomes even more important to try to prevent the arrival of these degenerative diseases by any means. We have talked about the importance of nutrition several times in previous articles. Today we will instead focus on the bad habits that we should avoid in order to protect our precious brain.

And as science confirms, one of the absolute worst is the abuse of alcoholic beverages.

The study of the impact of alcohol on dementia and Alzheimer’s

Recently, a group of French scholars published the results of a research on the relationship between alcohol and dementia in The Lancet Public Health. The data are definitely not very reassuring. The study team analyzed the clinical situation of 1.3 million people with dementia. Among these diagnoses, about 950 thousand seem to be linked to the abuse of alcoholic beverages. And by abuse, researchers mean a daily consumption of 4 doses per day of alcohol for men and 3 for women.

How alcohol affects the brain

According to the study, there are many ways alcohol could influence the development of degenerative brain disease. First, ethanol in alcoholic beverages would have a direct effect on poor brain health. Secondly, drinking too much appears to cause thiamin deficiency and promote the formation of some particular dementias. Finally, alcohol would impact other physical conditions that could damage neurons such as epilepsy, vascular dementia, and stroke.

Best not to drink or do it in moderation

The authors of the research also warned against alcohol consumption at any age, especially under 21. In young people, the nervous system is not yet fully formed and the risk is considerably higher. For adults, however, the maximum allowable limit should be one drink per day for women and two for men.

Deepening

Not only the liver but also these very dangerous tumors can be caused by alcohol

(The information in this article is for information purposes only and does not in any way substitute for medical advice and / or the opinion of a specialist. Furthermore, it does not constitute an element for formulating a diagnosis or for prescribing a treatment. For this reason it is recommended, in any case, to always seek the opinion of a doctor or a specialist and to read the warnings given. WHO”)
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