Home Health To combat cognitive decline, heart disease and thyroid problems, this gold-worthy nutrient may also be helpful

To combat cognitive decline, heart disease and thyroid problems, this gold-worthy nutrient may also be helpful

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We have already explained many times the importance of knowing what we put on the plate. In fact, food is one of the best ways to take vitamins and mineral salts that keep our body’s well-being high. For this reason today we want to give an example in this regard. In fact, this golden nutrient could also be useful to combat cognitive decline, heart disease and thyroid problems. Let’s see together what it is and in which foods we can find it.

We are talking about selenium, a very important element for the health of our body and which must therefore be kept under control.

To combat cognitive decline, heart disease and thyroid problems, this gold-worthy nutrient may also be helpful

According to Humanitas experts this is excellent for the regulation of the thyroid glands and for the correct functioning of cellular antioxidants. Taking it could also protect you from viral infections.

Many recommend supplementing it because it would also bring benefits to counteract cardiovascular system problems. In addition to selenium, however, it is important to remember potassium for the proper functioning of the heart. In fact, irregular heartbeat, muscle weakness and mood swings could be due to a lack of this precious mineral salt. However, before throwing yourself on do-it-yourself solutions, which also includes the exaggerated intake of certain types of food, we suggest you consult your GP.

Where to find it and what are the possible side effects

In fact, an excess or a shortage of selenium can lead to unpleasant consequences. We have already specified this in the case of B6: in fact, fatigue, water retention, insomnia and muscle spasms could indicate the lack of a precious vitamin.

In the first case it can cause intoxication that can manifest itself in the weakening of the nails and hair, nausea and diarrhea. In the second, however, it could lead to problems with skeletal muscles and the production of red blood cells.

The ideal dose for an adult is around 55 micrograms per day. This increases in pregnant women and decreases in children and those under the age of 14 in general. Finally, selenium is present for the most part in animal proteins, especially in fish and animal offal.

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(The information in this article is for informational purposes only and does not in any way substitute for medical advice and / or the opinion of a specialist. Furthermore, it does not constitute an element for formulating a diagnosis or for prescribing a treatment. For this reason it is recommended, in any case, to always seek the opinion of a doctor or a specialist and to read the warnings given. WHO”)
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