Home Health We would be less likely to contract Parkinson’s with this disease and for science it would be a surprising discovery

We would be less likely to contract Parkinson’s with this disease and for science it would be a surprising discovery

by admin
We would be less likely to contract Parkinson’s with this disease and for science it would be a surprising discovery

Parkinson’s disease would be a disabling degenerative disease, which would compromise not only the movement, but also the communicative part. In fact, it would have been associated with a brain disease, which would have repercussions similar to dementia. The trigger for both diseases would be the death of some important neurons. In the case of Parkinson’s, however, the neurons no longer functioning would be those relating to the motor sphere. The consequence would be the loss of control of the movements.

One of the symptoms of Parkinson’s would be tremor, which would cause considerable physical difficulty. Furthermore, the possibility of an aggravation of the disease, which could lead to affecting other functions, would not be excluded.

Parkinson’s, in most cases, would affect the elderly, whose average age is around 70 years old. However, there would be exceptions. In fact, for a matter of genetics, even the youngest subjects could be affected. Often, Parkinson’s and dementia would be linked. The likelihood that those with the disease could also develop a form of dementia would be high. However, we would be less likely to get Parkinson’s with this disease.

The heart attack

Science would have made an unexpected and surprising discovery. The Veronesi Foundation has taken up a study, according to which a person with a heart attack would have less risk of being struck by Parkinson’s disease. It would be the epilogue of the study published in the “Journal of the American Heart Association”, in which 182,000 patients, who would have developed a heart attack, would have been followed for several years.

See also  Twenty years of Gta 3, the video game that changed video games

The data would have shown that, among different patients with different diseases, those with heart attacks had a lower percentage of risk of developing Parkinson’s. For science, this would be good news, since, after a heart attack, one would have a high risk of incurring other diseases, including neurodegenerative ones.

We would be less likely to contract Parkinson’s with this disease and for science it would be a surprising discovery

After this discovery, it would appear that research is continuing and that it has been a starting point to investigate the matter, as well as to focus on further studies. Furthermore, it would have been found that some common risk factors among these diseases have less relevance for Parkinson’s.

In fact, if the major risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and diabetes, have a significant relevance in the case of a heart attack, they would not have the same effect, however, for the disease. It would seem a contradiction, yet the study would have come to these conclusions.

However, we remind you that this article is for information only and does not intend to replace the doctor’s opinion, which is undisputed. Therefore, we ask the expert questions about the matter, who will know how to give more detailed information.

Recommended reading

The brain may slowly shut down and age earlier with these habits and here’s what to do to get it active and improve memory

(The information in this article is for informational purposes only and does not in any way substitute for medical advice and / or the opinion of a specialist. Furthermore, it does not constitute an element for formulating a diagnosis or for prescribing a treatment. For this reason it is recommended, in any case, to always seek the opinion of a doctor or a specialist and to read the warnings regarding this article and the author’s responsibilities which can be consulted. WHO”)

You may also like

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Privacy & Cookies Policy