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Why learning to control your breath can benefit your mind (and your whole body)

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Why learning to control your breath can benefit your mind (and your whole body)

The breath is the first act we perform when we are born and the last when we leave. To live to be 80 is to perform over half a billion breaths considering that we make about 20 thousand a day. Breathing is such a simple and automatic behavior that one takes it for granted. Yet most of us breathe badly, uses less than 50% of breathing capacity — he points out Mike Maricspecialist in orthodontics and professor at the University of Pavia, author of the book The anti-stress power of the breath (Vallardi), freediving world champion, today coach, Coni level 4 European coach —. If we were able to use even just 10% more of our lung capacity we could gain in terms of well-being. By learning to breathe effectively you can improve blood pressure, heart rate and affect the activity of large areas of the brain and, consequently, on cognition, emotions, mood, stress and memory, according to Annual Review of Neuroscience.

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