Home » A man sued the Washington DC lottery for USD 961.8 million after an error that led him to believe he had won

A man sued the Washington DC lottery for USD 961.8 million after an error that led him to believe he had won

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A man sued the Washington DC lottery for USD 961.8 million after an error that led him to believe he had won

Man Sues Powerball Organizers After Website Error Causes Confusion and Distress

Washington, D.C. resident John Cheeks has filed a lawsuit against Powerball organizers, claiming that a website error caused him distress and confusion. Cheeks alleges that the Multi-State Lottery Association and Taoti Enterprises, which operates the drawing website, wrongly posted his numbers as winning an estimated prize of $340 million dollars.

The incident, which was triggered by a mistaken publication of winning numbers, has sparked a legal battle. Cheeks is seeking compensation of more than $320 million plus interest.

Rick Evans, the plaintiff’s attorney, told CBS News that the case “raises critical questions about the integrity and accountability of lottery operations and the protections, or lack thereof, against the kinds of errors they admit occurred in this case by Powerball and the DC Lottery.”

The conflict began when Cheeks purchased a lottery ticket on January 6, 2023. The following day, his numbers were listed as the winners on the DC Lottery and Gaming Office’s website, leading him to believe he had won the grand prize.

The situation became complicated when Cheeks was informed that his ticket was invalid due to an error in the publication of the winning numbers on the website. The lawsuit claims that for three days, from January 7 to 9, 2023, the website displayed two different sets of “winning numbers,” both the numbers on the ticket and the actual winning numbers announced in the televised drawing.

Cheeks is now demanding the winning amount from each of the defendants, totaling $961.8 million in compensatory relief. The defendants have filed a motion to dismiss the case, and a lawyer for Taoti declined to comment further.

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This incident has put the responsibility and transparency of lottery operations in the spotlight, setting a precedent for how errors that can profoundly affect people’s lives are handled. Cheeks, who has lived in Washington, D.C. for 40 years, is seeking a resolution that will offset the anguish and confusion caused by this peculiar mistake.

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