Home » For centuries, scientists have speculated about Archimedes’ death ray. At just 13 years old, this student created a miniature version

For centuries, scientists have speculated about Archimedes’ death ray. At just 13 years old, this student created a miniature version

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For centuries, scientists have speculated about Archimedes’ death ray.  At just 13 years old, this student created a miniature version

London, Ontario – A 13-year-old high school student from London, Ontario, may have uncovered the mystery behind one of Archimedes’ most infamous inventions – the death ray.

Brenden Sener recently won two gold medals and an award from the London Public Library for his miniature version of the contraption, a weapon composed of mirrors designed to focus sunlight towards a target and cause it to burn. This invention has puzzled scientists for centuries, as there is no archaeological evidence of its existence.

Sener, inspired by the Greek polymath after a family vacation to Greece, decided to explore the concept of the death ray for his science project. He conducted experiments with concave mirrors and a heat lamp, demonstrating that the addition of mirrors significantly increased the temperature at the focal point.

The young scientist’s findings have impressed experts in the field. Cliff Ho, chief scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, described Sener’s project as “an excellent assessment of fundamental processes,” confirming the first law of thermodynamics.

While Sener’s experiment did not reach the temperatures needed to ignite a fire, he believes that with the use of a larger mirror and sunlight, combustion could be achieved. The teenager’s mother, Melanie, expressed no surprise at her son’s passion for science, noting his fascination with history, science, and nature.

Sener’s project has reignited the debate surrounding Archimedes’ death ray, a controversial topic that has been explored by various groups, including the Discovery Channel series “MythBusters.”

Despite skepticism about the viability of the death ray, experts like Thomas Chondros, a retired professor from the University of Patras (Greece), have praised Sener’s project for its innovation and documentation. Chondros believes that the experiment could spark discussions among young students and even university students.

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As Sener continues to pursue his passion for science, he envisions a future career as a scientist in engineering, bioengineering, or medicine. His dedication to uncovering the mysteries of the past and pushing the boundaries of scientific innovation serves as an inspiration for aspiring young scientists around the world.

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