Home » Supreme Court temporarily suspends Texas Law SB-4, which authorizes the arrest of undocumented immigrants

Supreme Court temporarily suspends Texas Law SB-4, which authorizes the arrest of undocumented immigrants

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Supreme Court temporarily suspends Texas Law SB-4, which authorizes the arrest of undocumented immigrants

Judge Samuel Alito has issued an order suspending the implementation of Law SB-4 in Texas, which criminalizes irregular immigration, until March 13. The state of Texas has been requested to respond by March 11.

Under the SB-4 law, detained individuals could accept an order from a Texas judge to leave the country or face misdemeanor charges related to illegal entry into the United States. Those who refuse to leave after receiving the order could be detained again and face more serious charges.

The Justice Department has argued before the Supreme Court that this law would disrupt the balance established for almost 150 years between the federal government and states on immigration matters. They warned that it could have adverse effects on the bilateral relationship between the United States and Mexico and create chaos in the application of federal immigration laws in Texas.

Univision 23 News gained access to one of the temporary prisons where immigrants arrested under the SB-4 law could be taken. The facility has 40 square foot cells and a capacity for 22 detainees. These prisons could house both migrants and common criminals.

Melissa López, an immigrant activist, raised concerns about the potential for citizens to be arrested based on a certain “racial profile” under the SB-4 law. Commander Ryan Urrutia of the El Paso Sheriff’s Office expressed uncertainty about how they would operate with the entry into force of the law and emphasized the potential for racial profiling.

The impact of the SB-4 law on the El Paso community, including the operation of prisons and potential racial profiling, remains a topic of concern as the implementation of the law remains suspended pending further response and review.

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The future of immigration enforcement in Texas and the potential consequences of the SB-4 law are yet to be fully determined as legal challenges and concerns continue to be addressed.

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