Home News The number of deaths from the epidemic in rural Shanxi soared, and new graves were added everywhere in the countryside | COVID-19 | Coffins | Number of infected people in China

The number of deaths from the epidemic in rural Shanxi soared, and new graves were added everywhere in the countryside | COVID-19 | Coffins | Number of infected people in China

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The number of deaths from the epidemic in rural Shanxi soared, and new graves were added everywhere in the countryside | COVID-19 | Coffins | Number of infected people in China

[The Epoch Times, January 25, 2023](Comprehensive report by Epoch Times reporter Chen Ting) After the COVID-19 virus swept across major cities in China, the CCP tried its best to cover up the real number of infections and deaths, but the number of deaths was reported everywhere Signs of a sharp rise. There is evidence that the death toll is considerable and increasing.

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) said (link) that they interviewed in-depth northern Shanxi province and found signs of a rising death toll.

According to reports, the coffin makers said they have been very busy recently. In recent months, they say, they have been too busy to take a break, but the coffins are still often sold out.

The local crematorium is also quite busy. Some funeral supplies businesses said they saw a surge in demand that doubled or tripled the usual level.

The BBC reporter said that every person related to the funeral industry they met locally in Shanxi told them a similar plot, that is, COVID-19 has led to an increasing number of deaths.

The cost of funerals has skyrocketed and people are having to pay more because of the rise in COVID-19 deaths, a bereaved family said.

It is currently the Chinese New Year holiday. In the past, hundreds of millions of young people returned to their hometowns from the city to celebrate the New Year. However, the villages they returned to are now populated mainly by older people who are more vulnerable to Covid-19.

The government has warned those in cities not to return home this year if their elderly relatives have not been infected.

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Dong Yongming, a doctor who runs a small rural clinic, believes at least 80 percent of the local population has been infected.

“All the villagers come to us when they are sick. We are the only clinic here,” he said.

Most of those who died had underlying conditions, he said. In order to control the quantity of medicines, Dr. Dong said that he would only prescribe “four ibuprofen tablets” at a time to avoid waste.

Some locals are used to burying the dead in the fields. The farmers then continue to grow crops and raise livestock around their ancestors’ graves.

As the BBC reporter drove along the road, he noticed a large number of new mounds with red flags on them. A sheep farmer confirmed that these are new graves.

“Some families have been burying older people here after they’ve died,” he said. “It’s just too many.”

The farmer said that during the latest wave of infections, people in his village died every day for a month.

“Someone dies one day, and then another dies the next day,” he said. “It’s been going on for the past month.”

But the farmer said people would still celebrate the New Year as usual. “My son and daughter-in-law will be back soon,” he said.

Asked if he was worried about family members returning and possibly spreading the virus, the farmer said: “People should not be worried. Not afraid!”

“Even if you hide, you’re still going to get infected. Most of us are already infected,” he said, saying he and many others hoped the wave of deaths had passed.

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Editor in charge: Ye Ziwei #

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