Home » A former Pokémon Company lawyer discusses the company’s internal thoughts on removing “Pokémon” fan games, saying that no one likes to sue fans | Computer King Ada | LINE TODAY

A former Pokémon Company lawyer discusses the company’s internal thoughts on removing “Pokémon” fan games, saying that no one likes to sue fans | Computer King Ada | LINE TODAY

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A former Pokémon Company lawyer discusses the company’s internal thoughts on removing “Pokémon” fan games, saying that no one likes to sue fans | Computer King Ada | LINE TODAY

The Pokémon Company to Ease Restrictions on Fan-Made Games, Former Chief Legal Officer Says

In a surprising move, Don McGowan, former chief legal officer at The Pokémon Company, recently spoke out about the company’s stance on fan-made projects. In an interview with Aftermath, McGowan revealed that the company will not proactively target fan games unless they involve crowdfunding or cross a certain line.

“We will not issue immediate removal requests to fans. Instead, we will wait and see if these games receive funding through platforms like Kickstarter. But no one likes to sue the fans,” McGowan stated.

According to McGowan, the legal team at The Pokémon Company often learns about fan games that use their copyrighted properties when they are reported in the media.

Despite this more lenient approach, there have been instances where fan games have been taken down at the request of Nintendo officials. In 2018, a fan-developed production tool for creating Pokémon games was shut down by Nintendo. Similarly, in 2021, the long-running fan game “Pokémon: Uranium” ceased development due to intervention from Nintendo.

More recently, a popular Pokémon fan first-person shooter game was removed by The Pokémon Company in 2022. However, the release of the game “Pokémon Pallu” earlier this year, which drew comparisons to the Pokémon series, sparked excitement among players. Nintendo has stated that they will investigate any potential intellectual property infringement related to the game.

Despite the success of “Pokémon Pallu,” Nintendo quickly took action when a player created mods that replaced the characters with Pokémon. This move highlights the ongoing struggle between fan creations and intellectual property rights in the gaming industry.

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As the gaming community continues to innovate and create fan projects, it remains to be seen how companies like The Pokémon Company will navigate the complex relationship between fan-made content and copyright protection.

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