Home » Copernicus: February 2024 the hottest ever recorded on Earth. Record for ninth consecutive month

Copernicus: February 2024 the hottest ever recorded on Earth. Record for ninth consecutive month

by admin
Copernicus: February 2024 the hottest ever recorded on Earth.  Record for ninth consecutive month

Listen to the audio version of the article

This past month was the warmest February ever recorded in the world, part of a series of nine consecutive monthly records, with temperatures well above normal in Europe. Copernicus announced it. According to the monthly bulletin of the European Observatory, an average air temperature of 13.54°C was reached in February, which is 1.77°C above the February average for the period 1850-1900. Furthermore, the temperature of the oceans is also particularly warm, which largely contributes to this extraordinary series.

In February, a new absolute record was reached, with 21.06°C recorded on the surface of the seas, excluding areas close to the poles.

In 2023 red sticker for climate, 378 extreme events +22%

New temperature records

For the ninth consecutive month, Earth broke global heat records: February, winter as a whole, and the world‘s oceans set new temperature records. The latest record in this climate change-fueled streak of global heat includes sea surface temperatures that were not only the warmest in February, but eclipsed any month on record, surpassing the August 2023 mark and rising again at the end of the month. Furthermore, February, as well as the previous two winter months, far exceeded the internationally established threshold for long-term warming, Copernicus reported. The last month that did not set a record for warmest month was May 2023, which narrowly preceded 2020 and 2016. Copernicus records fell regularly from June onwards. February 2024 averaged 13.54 degrees Celsius, beating the old record from 2016 by about an eighth of a degree. According to Copernicus calculations, February was 1.77 degrees Celsius warmer than at the end of the 19th century. Only last December did February surpass pre-industrial levels.

You may also like

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Privacy & Cookies Policy