Home » Who appeared first among the first black holes or galaxies in the universe?New discoveries from the Webb telescope subvert knowledge | TechNews Science and Technology News

Who appeared first among the first black holes or galaxies in the universe?New discoveries from the Webb telescope subvert knowledge | TechNews Science and Technology News

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Who appeared first among the first black holes or galaxies in the universe?New discoveries from the Webb telescope subvert knowledge | TechNews Science and Technology News

The Origin of the Universe: Did Black Holes Come Before Stars and Galaxies?

Recent data from the Webb Space Telescope has brought about a significant shift in our understanding of the early universe. Contrary to the traditional view that black holes only formed after the appearance of stars and galaxies, the new analysis suggests that supermassive black holes not only existed at the beginning of the universe but also played a crucial role in promoting the formation of new stars and galaxies.

Supermassive black holes are typically found at the centers of galaxies, exerting a gravitational pull on all celestial bodies within the system. It was previously believed that stars and galaxies formed first, with matter accumulating over time to give rise to supermassive black holes.

However, the latest analysis of early universe data has revealed that black holes and galaxies coexisted from the early stages, and black holes were instrumental in shaping the evolving galaxies around them. This challenges our previous understanding of how galaxies formed.

The conventional idea of black hole formation involves the collapse of a particularly large star, leaving behind a black hole with a mass approximately 50 times that of the sun. However, the mass of a supermassive black hole can range from millions to billions of times that of the sun.

The recent discovery of several supermassive black holes less than 500 million years after the Big Bang suggests an alternative mechanism for black hole formation: the direct collapse of a massive cloud of material into a black hole, rather than the explosion and collapse of a star.

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According to the research team from Johns Hopkins University, black holes and galaxies may have coexisted within the first 100 million years of the universe’s existence and influenced each other’s development. The plasma jet flowing out from the black hole at high speed acts as a particle accelerator, accelerating the formation of new stars and stimulating subsequent generations of growth in galaxies.

This groundbreaking revelation opens up new possibilities for understanding the early universe and the processes that shaped its evolution. More observations in the future are expected to help astronomers validate their models and gain further insights into the mysteries of the universe.

The findings of this research have been published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, marking a significant milestone in our quest to unravel the secrets of the universe.

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