Home » A South African court has ruled on the legitimacy of the name of former president Jacob Zuma’s new party

A South African court has ruled on the legitimacy of the name of former president Jacob Zuma’s new party

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A South African court has ruled on the legitimacy of the name of former president Jacob Zuma’s new party

A court in Durban, South Africa, he established the legitimacy of the name and logo of the country’s former president Jacob Zuma’s new party, uMkhonto we Sizwe (“spear of the nation”, abbreviated to MK). The African National Congress (ANC), the party that has governed the country since the 1990s, had in fact sued MK, claiming that it violated the law on registered trademarks, given that it takes its name from that of the armed wing of the ANC which had helped found the historic South African president Nelson Mandela. According to the court, however, this is not the case: the party will therefore be able to present itself in the next elections to renew the 400 seats of the National Assembly and elect a new president with both the name and the logo, which have great symbolic value in the country.

Zuma is 82 years old, he was president of South Africa from 2009 to 2018 and between 2007 and 2017 he was also president of the ANC, of ​​which he had been a member since 1959. Last December, however, he accused the party of having lost the radicalism of began and had announced his support for the MK, which is why the ANC suspended him. Although he has been involved in several corruption scandals and trials, Zuma is still much loved by a good part of the South African population. At the end of March the Electoral Commission of South Africa had excluded his candidacy in the elections due to a 15-month prison sentence for failing to appear at the hearings of a trial against him: the MK, however, had taken legal action to obtain the annulment of this decision, which was then accepted.

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The elections on May 29 will be the most competitive since the end of apartheid in South Africa in 1994. It is unlikely that the MK will win them, but it is very possible that it will be able to steal votes from the ANC, which may find itself without the majority in the South African parliament for the first time in the last thirty years.

– Read also: The return of Jacob Zuma

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