Home » Ryoko Akamatsu, the daughter of an Osaka painter, attended Tsuda Juku College (currently Tsuda College)…: Tokyo Shimbun TOKYO Web

Ryoko Akamatsu, the daughter of an Osaka painter, attended Tsuda Juku College (currently Tsuda College)…: Tokyo Shimbun TOKYO Web

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Ryoko Akamatsu, the daughter of an Osaka painter, attended Tsuda Juku College (currently Tsuda College)…: Tokyo Shimbun TOKYO Web

Ryoko Akamatsu, the daughter of an Osaka painter, entered the Ministry of Labor (currently the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare) in 1953 after attending Tsuda College (now Tsuda College) and the University of Tokyo. She was interested in labor issues, but at Kasumigaseki at the time, There was also the reality that no other government office was hiring women for senior positions. She was assigned to the Women’s Division, where female employees gather, with the mission of improving the status of women, but it was difficult for her to move on. She hates other departments because she says, “Even if they give me a woman,” my male colleagues gain experience in multiple departments and get promoted, but I’m disappointed. He was later transferred, but was given a monotonous job. “It was pathetic that there was no way of predicting whether they would be treated as equals.” According to her book, “The Long Quest for Gender Equality: My Resume,” Ms. Akamatsu, a pioneering female bureaucrat who was also a non-parliamentary minister and also served as Minister of Education, has passed away. In the 1980s, she was the “mother of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act” and worked as the director of a government office to enact the Equal Employment Opportunity Law.In the Showa era, there was little understanding of the business world, and she was forced to compromise by limiting equal treatment in hiring and promotion to an obligation to make efforts. Ta. My philosophy is to move forward even if it is far from the ideal. The law was later tightened, but efforts to approach the ideal entrusted to younger generations remain incomplete. After the war, trains heading to Tokyo for higher education were packed so tightly that it was almost impossible to see outside, and the changing sounds of rattling made it difficult to cross the river. After realizing this, he thought, “There are so many rivers between Osaka and Tokyo.” I feel like she was hinting at a life where you can’t see the scenery and go on a journey, even if you just grope your way through it. She was the person who built a bridge over the uncrossable river.

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