Home » The Iranian regime prevented Mahsa Amini’s family from leaving the country to collect the European Sakharov Prize

The Iranian regime prevented Mahsa Amini’s family from leaving the country to collect the European Sakharov Prize

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The Iranian regime prevented Mahsa Amini’s family from leaving the country to collect the European Sakharov Prize

The Iranian regime has prevented the family of Mahsa Amini, a young woman who died in 2022 after being detained for not wearing the Islamic veil correctly, from leaving the country. This has prevented them from traveling to France to receive the Sakharov Prize for freedom of conscience, awarded by the European Parliament.

According to lawyer Chirinne Ardakani, the family, including parents Amjad Amini, Mojgan Eftekhari, and brother Ashkan, were prevented from leaving Iran and had their passports confiscated to stop them from traveling to Paris.

Mahsa Amini’s death sparked protests calling for the end of the Iranian regime, resulting in a crackdown that led to at least 500 deaths, over 22,000 arrests, and eight public executions.

In October, the European Parliament awarded the Sakharov Prize for freedom of conscience to Mahsa Amini and the “Women, Life and Freedom” movement, which protested discriminatory laws against women in Iran.

The award ceremony is scheduled for December 13 in the chamber of the European Parliament in Strasbourg.

Mahsa Amini died in 2022 after being beaten by Iranian religious police for not wearing her hijab correctly and subsequently falling into a coma. Her mother claimed she had been beaten in front of her brother and that the police continued to attack her during her journey to the police station until she became unconscious.

After Mahsa Amini’s death, the United Nations special rapporteur on human rights in Iran, Javaid Rehman, stated that her murder and the subsequent repression of protests could be considered crimes against humanity.

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Rehman also expressed concerns about mass poisonings in girls’ schools, as well as the persecution and discrimination against ethnic and religious minorities in Iran.

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