Home » Vice Chancellor of Uruguay recounted the “uncomfortable situations” he experienced at Celac after criticizing Maduro

Vice Chancellor of Uruguay recounted the “uncomfortable situations” he experienced at Celac after criticizing Maduro

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Vice Chancellor of Uruguay recounted the “uncomfortable situations” he experienced at Celac after criticizing Maduro

Uruguay’s Vice Foreign Minister Condemns Political Bans in Venezuela

At the recent summit of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (Celac) in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, tensions arose when Nicolás Maduro, the President of Venezuela, entered the hotel lounge visibly upset. His anger stemmed from comments made by the Vice Foreign Minister of Uruguay, Nicolás Albertoni, who had condemned political bans in Venezuela.

Albertoni called on the government of Venezuela to return to the path of democratic convenience, citing President Luis Lacalle Pou’s previous statements on the matter. He specifically mentioned the arbitrary bans on individuals such as María Corina Machado, the arrests of activist Rocío San Miguel, and the expulsion of the representative of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, which he deemed inadmissible.

In response to Maduro’s discomfort, Albertoni chose not to delve into the details of any uncomfortable situations that arose following his speech. He reiterated Uruguay’s longstanding position in defense of freedom and democracy.

Maduro later criticized Lacalle Pou for having “double standards” and “double morals” in addressing internal affairs in Venezuela while remaining silent on issues in Palestine. Albertoni also pointed out the varying levels of commitment to democracy, the rule of law, and human rights among countries in the region.

The tension between Uruguay and Venezuela highlights the ongoing challenges within the region in upholding democratic principles. For more information on this developing story, visit INFOBAE.

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