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The Key Role of Oxytocin in Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: University of Tokyo Study

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The Key Role of Oxytocin in Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: University of Tokyo Study

A groundbreaking study conducted by the University of Tokyo has revealed crucial data that could potentially halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease worldwide. The research found that hormones, often referred to as “chemical messengers,” play a key role in diseases like dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Among these hormones, there is a group known as happiness hormones, responsible for generating feelings of well-being and happiness. Stephanie Watson, former executive editor of Harvard Women’s Health Watch, identified four main happiness hormones: serotonin, dopamine, endorphins, and oxytocin.

Of these hormones, oxytocin has been a focal point in recent research conducted by Japanese scientists. The study highlighted the significant impact of oxytocin on cognitive function, offering a promising avenue for the development of therapies targeting dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Oxytocin is closely linked to feelings of pleasure and affection, helping the brain form bonds with individuals in our social circle. It is often referred to as the “love hormone,” as physical contact and intimate relationships can elevate oxytocin levels significantly.

Additionally, specialists point out that during pregnancy, a woman’s body undergoes immense stress, including sleep deprivation and physical discomfort. Understanding the role of oxytocin in the brain could lead to new insights and potential treatment options for Alzheimer’s and other cognitive decline-related conditions.

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