Home » Ancient stars can produce superheavy elements unknown to science, with atomic masses greater than 260 | TechNews Science and Technology News

Ancient stars can produce superheavy elements unknown to science, with atomic masses greater than 260 | TechNews Science and Technology News

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Ancient stars can produce superheavy elements unknown to science, with atomic masses greater than 260 | TechNews Science and Technology News

Ancient Stars May Have Produced Unknown Extremely Heavy Elements

A recent study has found evidence that ancient stars may have produced extremely heavy elements that are unknown to science. The study, conducted by a team at North Carolina State University, suggests that there may be elements with atomic masses exceeding 260 u in stars. This discovery challenges our understanding of the periodic table and the limits of element production in the universe.

Stars have long been known as cosmic factories, producing new elements through the fusion of existing ones. When stars die, the elements they’ve created are spread throughout the universe with their explosion, providing the next generation of stars with a higher-end “base” to produce heavier elements. However, the new research suggests that there may be previously overlooked patterns in the heavy element content of stars.

The team examined the heavy element content of 42 well-analyzed stars in the Milky Way and found that they are rich in heavy elements such as ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, and silver. What’s most intriguing is that the elements immediately next to them in the periodic table do not have the same correlation, indicating that these elements are formed by the decay of heavier elements with an atomic mass of at least 260 u.

Scientists have long suspected that there may be more elements outside the periodic table, but their atomic mass makes them unstable and quickly decay into lighter elements. If these extremely heavy elements can one day be detected in space, it will provide a better understanding of how the rich diversity of elements in the universe came to be.

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The research, published in the journal Science, opens up new possibilities for exploring the limits of element production in the universe and promises to deepen our understanding of the fundamental building blocks of the cosmos. As we continue to look out into the vast expanse of space, the potential for new discoveries beyond the periodic table is growing.

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