Home » Cannabis legalization: According to the Union factions, cannabis law is contrary to international law

Cannabis legalization: According to the Union factions, cannabis law is contrary to international law

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Cannabis legalization: According to the Union factions, cannabis law is contrary to international law

According to the Union faction leaders, Germany is violating international and European law with the planned legalization of cannabis. “International law only permits the use of cannabis for scientific and medical purposes in a narrow sense, but not commercial cultivation and trade,” says the draft resolution that the chairmen of the CDU and CSU factions presented at their conference this Sunday want to decide in Brussels. The paper is available to the dpa news agency.

According to the draft resolution, the UN drug control bodies consider comprehensive cannabis legalization, as intended by the federal government, “in constant decision-making practice as a breach of the UN conventions on combating drugs”. Since the European Union has been a party to the central UN Convention on Drugs since 1988, its regulations are also part of European law. Furthermore, the cannabis law also violates EU contract law.

Union faction leaders are calling for a stop to the cannabis law

The chairmen of the CDU/CSU parliamentary groups in the German state parliaments, the German Bundestag and the CDU/CSU group in the EPP parliamentary group are therefore calling for the law to be stopped in the Bundesrat’s mediation committee in their paper. Otherwise, the Federal President would have to “refuse to sign such a law.”

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“The traffic light wants to push through the cannabis law against all social and party-internal resistance and with an incredible ignorance of medical advice,” said the Bavarian CSU parliamentary group leader Klaus Holetschek to the dpa. Even the Federal Ministry of Health‘s own studies have predicted that consumption among young people will increase.

Police union calls for therapy places instead of legalization

The German Police Union (DPolG) has also criticized the planned cannabis legalization because of the health risks for young people. Union chairman Rainer Wendt said Neuen Osnabrücker Zeitung (NOZ)he would have liked Federal Health Minister Karl Lauterbach (SPD) to instead think more about “the fact that young people who have fallen on such a path and want to leave it need therapy places.”

Wendt also criticized the allowance of up to 50 grams per month: “You can walk around the world stoned all month long!” As an alternative to legalization, the police union suggests transferring the cannabis ban into administrative offenses law in order to give municipalities the opportunity to “flexibly apply” sanction instruments.

The law on the partial legalization of cannabis for personal consumption was recently passed by the Bundestag with the majority of the traffic light coalition. According to the law, consumption and possession of up to 25 grams of cannabis will be permitted in the future, but only for adults. Up to 50 grams and three plants are permitted for home cultivation, provided the drugs are protected from access by minors.

According to the Union faction leaders, Germany is violating international and European law with the planned legalization of cannabis. “International law only permits the use of cannabis for scientific and medical purposes in a narrow sense, but not commercial cultivation and trade,” says the draft resolution that the chairmen of the CDU and CSU factions presented at their conference this Sunday want to decide in Brussels. The paper is available to the dpa news agency.

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