Home Technology As predicted by general relativity, the first discovery of extreme precession motion in the collision of double black holes | TechNews Technology News

As predicted by general relativity, the first discovery of extreme precession motion in the collision of double black holes | TechNews Technology News

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As predicted by general relativity, the first discovery of extreme precession motion in the collision of double black holes | TechNews Technology News

The crazy degree of rotation after a pair of black holes collided, once again proving the correctness of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Astronomers analyzed the GW200129 double black hole merger discovered by LIGO and Virgo and saw the black hole precession wobble predicted by general relativity, 10 billion times faster than past observations of other celestial bodies’ precession.

In 2020, LIGO and Virgo collaborated to discover an event called a pair of double black holes colliding to release gravitational waves, named GW200129. The mass of the larger black hole before the merger was about 40 times that of the sun, and the Cardiff University team in the United Kingdom made follow-up analysis and found one of them. Black holes are spinning like crazy.

Einstein’s general theory of relativity predicted more than 100 years ago that an axial precession phenomenon called precession should occur in a binary black hole system, but the effect signal is very weak and difficult to detect, until now scientists have finally observed this rare phenomenon Phenomenon.

The 2 giant objects are pulling each other in closer and closer orbits, shaking like drunken tops. In the past, it took astronomers more than 75 years to find the fastest precession motion from a pair of pulsar orbits, but the GW200129 black hole is wobbling faster than The former is 10 billion times faster, 3 times per second.

Most of the black holes we’ve discovered so far in gravitational wave events spin fairly slowly, with GW200129 likely being an exception. The new paper was published in the journal Nature.

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(Source of the first image: pixabay)

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